Cathode-biased AC80/100s - thin edged boxes: late 1963 - autumn 1964

serial nos 102 - 173



The amps listed below are necessarily not a complete record of survivals. If anyone knows of any others, please email me at click here for the address. This page will be updated, so please come back to look from time to time.

Serial number 117 - currently in the USA
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Serial number 117. Front with reproduction speaker cab.
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Serial number 117. Rear view.
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Serial number 117. Schema of back panel.

Pictures by kind permission of North Coast Music

Perhaps the earliest surviving AC80/100. Owned by North Coast Music click here for the Vox Showroom site. The amp sits atop a reproduction cabinet. Note the presence of double XLR output sockets. Presumably used for bass, and perhaps once had a "BASS" flag, now gone.

Serial number 119?

Cited by Jim Elyea, Vox Amplifiers, p. 452 as having serial number 11 19.

Serial number 150 - currently in Florida
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Serial number 150. Top view
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Serial number 150. Front view
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Serial number 150. On exhibition at the Vox Fest, 2005
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Serial number 150. Pages from 20th Century Guitar magazine, 1999
Bill Wyman's Vox AC100
Serial number 150
The rear of Bill Wyman's AC80/100 - identical in arrangement to no. 150
Bill Wyman's Vox AC100
The rear of Bill Wyman's AC80/100 - identical in arrangement to no. 150
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Serial number 150. Schema of back panel
NME Concert 1965
Serial number 150. NME Pollwinners Concert 1965
Vox Talks Beatles Gear
Serial number 150. Page from VoxTalks (now gone)
Vox Talks Beatles Gear
Serial number 150. Page from VoxTalks (now gone)
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Serial number 150. 8-line serial number plate
serial number 150, latching cannon xlr-3-13
Serial number 150. Latching Cannon XLR-3-13
serial number 150, latching cannon xlr-3-13
Serial number 150. Latching Cannon XLR-3-13

Another early one, still with its 'BASS' logo. As the Beatles Gear section on the now defunct VoxTalks website indicated in the early 2000s (see the screen-shots above), the amp was purchased in October 1966 by Dave Morris, bassist of the Rocking Roadrunners, from Cecil Gullickson's Music Mart in Orlando, Florida, having been refurbished by JMI and sent over to the States for resale. Presumably it had initially been owned or used by some important band in England before being returned to JMI for repair. For years, no. 150 was pictured on the voxamps.com website (but is now no longer there), though it never belonged to Korg or Vox. The claimed association of the amp with Paul McCartney is unfortunately erroneous.

Note the arrangement of its back panel - a completely different arrangement from the panels of the amps that McCartney is pictured with - but it does mirror that of the amp that Bill Wyman had in early April 1964 - see pictures 5 and 6 above, taken in 1964 and 1965 respectively, and this page. Serial no. 150 is reported in Jim's book, p. 448, and was featured in an excellent short article by Mitch Colby, 20th Century Guitar Magazine, July 1999, p. 113 - click on the fourth picture for a PDF.

The remaining speaker XLR, probably original, is a latching Cannon XLR-3-13 - as in the pics of an unused example. Paul McCartney's amp - click here - appears to have had a similar connector. The barrels are 1 inch in diameter (rather than the 3/4 inch of the rectangular Cannon XLRs.)

Note that the serial plate has 8 lines of text. Later AC80/100s have 9 lines. "50" is chalked inside the box. Thanks to Dave Morris for the info.

Thin-edged box (containing a later amp) - potentially produced originally for an AC80/100 with a serial number in the range 151-180 - currently in Australia

Thin-edged box with original black grille cloth. Note however, that there is no "scrim" behind the grille cloth, no aluminium blind rivet nuts for the back panel screws, nor any internal bracing for the sides - see the images of the box of no. 173 below for comparison. Perhaps refurbished - the baffle is not blacked. This box has been the home for at least 15 years of an AC100 produced by Triumph (and bearing a Triumph plaque) in 1967 - the amp is illustrated on the Triumph-made amps page. Its closest relative, it should be said, also lives in an unexpected box. The back panel has a Cannon mains connector, and now two round Switchcraft XLRs, replacing the original rectangular Cannons. No serial plate on the back, nor any warning plaque.

Serial number unknown - currently in the UK
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In excellent electronic condition. One of the most original chassis of those pictured on this page. The plate resistors and part of the underside power board flamed out at some point, a fate that seems to have befallen almost all early AC80/100s, but otherwise very very few replaced components. Note the 1M white Erie resistors in the preamp. Visible capacitor codes - UK - date to October 1963. Capacitors bearing these codes run through to amps with serial numbers in the 300s. Westrex, the contractors that made these chassis, evidently had substantial stocks. The same is true for the 270ohm cathode resistors, which have codes VA = January 1964 - one finds these also in serial number 185. The thin-edged box is intriguing - professionally made, but in the format of an "expanded" large AC50 box. Large AC50 boxes have front grilles that are 4 diamonds tall and 15 wide. This box is 4 1/2 diamonds tall and 17 wide. Note the careful cut-outs of the baffle, and the scrim behind the grille cloth. Was this perhaps a special order or a prototype of some sort? It must be said, however, that the cloth more resembles that used on solid state amps in the later 1960s.

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The panel with the XLR speaker connectors is from an early large-box AC50



At around this time the serial number plate changed from 8-line to 9-line.

Note that serial no. 169, pictured below, was not produced to accompany the cabinet and trolley on which it is pictured. However, the amp's black cloth indicates that it was made to accompany a similar unit, now gone - therefore in or after August 1964, the month in which John and Paul received the first 4x12 SDL cabs.

beatles in stockholm, july 1964

Above, first sighting of John and George's black-grilled thin-edged AC80/100s, Stockholm, 28th July 1964 - used with large AC50 cabs.

The presence of brown cloth on survivals below - 173's cloth is replaced unfortunately - presupposes use with brown-fronted bass cabinets.

In terms of the pricelists issued by JMI, SDL speaker cabs and trolleys first make their appearance in September 1964:

169

Click on the image to see the full page on the Vox Showroom website.

Serial number 169 - currently in the USA
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Illustrated in Jim Elyea's book. Nine-line serial number plate. Note the black grille cloth. In the second picture the amp sits on an original Mk1 trolley (belonging to another amp), with a square "basket" to hold the amp securely. The square basket - an excellent piece of design - was discontinued, probably being too costly to produce in numbers.

In 2003 a Korg representative stumbled across this cabinet and trolley and its amp - serial no. 225 - in a music shop in Denver, where it had been for some time. They were subsequently acquired by Mitch Colby and shipped to New York. Some years later Jim Elyea purchased the rig from MC.

Serial number 173 - currently in the UK
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Bought second hand from Macari's on Charing Cross Road in 1969 by the manager of the Dutch band, the "To-Pieces" (pictured above). The first five pictures above show the amp shortly before its arrival in the UK - it had been in the manager's loft. Used by the bassist of the group, Joop van der Brugge, standing centre. The amp had already had at least one owner by 1969, however - K. Wright, who inscribed his name on the control plate. The grille cloth has probably been replaced (with two pieces forming a seam in the middle), and at some point the plate resistors went up in flames and were renewed, along with a few other components. The power section tagboards of AC80/100s seem regularly to have burned out. The transformers are the original green Wodens, painted black doubtless in an attempt to retard heat.

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The date code on the volume pot is AL = January 1964, which is also the date of the volume pot of the amp second from bottom on this page. Westrex, the contractors that made these amps, evidently had stocks that were used during the course of 1964. New picture added above (26 June 2012)

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On to serial numbers 174 - 199


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